02/08/2018 – Could Shipping Containers be the Answer to All Our Problems

By Catriona Lingwood, Chief Executive of Constructing Excellence in the North East

Shipping container architecture, using steel shipping containers as structural elements, has grown in popularity due to their strength, availability and low cost. They have been used creatively and innovatively by architects to produce some very eye-catching results including fully modified homes, offices, toilets or simply used for storage.

Shipping container villages are popping up all over the country, with two of the newest based here in the North East. The Newcastle container hub, Stack, is due to open in the city centre in a few weeks. Stack aims to combine the best elements of food festivals and continental markets. It will provide a launchpad for up to 50 SMEs all of which will be run from shipping containers, creating and sustaining around 500 jobs over the four years it will be on site. On the Gateshead Quayside, another container village ‘HWKRMRKT’ opened earlier this summer hosting a collection of 15 independent street traders selling pizza, tacos, burgers, ice creams, cakes and more. The village has a very ‘cosmopolitan’ feel and has already proven to be extremely popular, bringing life to a once empty area. This is one of the reasons I love this industry, it has the ability to create something amazing, just a few shipping containers (and a lot of hard work from those involved) have generated such a feel-good atmosphere.

It’s not just businesses that are using shipping containers, they are also being used to tackle housing shortages, by turning them into homes. Last year, Cadwyn Housing Association in Cardiff was granted permission to create 14 homes from shipping containers. The development will include seven one-bedroom containers and seven two-bedroom containers. The homes will be used as temporary affordable housing, but they could be the answer to some of our housing problems.It is not just helping new businesses they are also being used to help those who have fallen on hard times to take the vital first step off living on the street.

Containers are ideal to be used as a building material, they are strong, can be stacked and are very easy to move. When discussing a project early on, it’s important to think about the sustainability and how eco-friendly it can be and using shipping containers that can be recycled plays a huge part in that. Once a container is modified, the steel is recycled and there’s less impact on the environment due to fewer first use materials being used during construction e.g. concrete, timber or bricks.

The Welsh Assembly has an Innovation housing programme specifically looking to tackle housing. Shipping containers being turned into homes is one of the solutions.

Towards the end of 2017 Cardiff Council received funding from the programme to build eight energy-efficient family homes in the grounds of Greenfarm Hostel in Ely .

And earlier this year Cadwyn Housing Association was given permission to create 14 homes in shipping containers on Bute Street in Cardiff.

The development will include seven one-bedroom containers and seven two-bedroom containers as well as a warden’s office.

The homes are planned as temporary affordable housing on a short-term basis.

It is not just helping new businesses they are also being used to help those who have fallen on hard times to take the vital first step off living on the street.

The Welsh Assembly has an Innovation housing programme specifically looking to tackle housing. Shipping containers being turned into homes is one of the solutions.

Towards the end of 2017 Cardiff Council received funding from the programme to build eight energy-efficient family homes in the grounds of Greenfarm Hostel in Ely .

And earlier this year Cadwyn Housing Association was given permission to create 14 homes in shipping containers on Bute Street in Cardiff.

The development will include seven one-bedroom containers and seven two-bedroom containers as well as a warden’s office.

The homes are planned as temporary affordable housing on a short-term basis.

Last year, the housing white paper, highlighted that not enough local authorities are planning for the homes needed and house building is simply too slow. Yes, the government is doing a lot to increase the number of new houses, but we need houses now and with the skills shortage, using shipping containers could be part of the solution. Who knows, these unconventional methods could take off and in a few years, traditional builds might all be a thing of the past.

For more information on Constructing Excellence in the North East, please contact chief executive, Catriona Lingwood, on 0191 500 7880 or email catriona@cene.org.uk.