Our Ecological Responsibility

By Catriona Lingwood, Chief Executive of Constructing Excellence in the North East

Eco-friendly, or ecological, construction is building a structure that is beneficial or non-harmful to the environment. Solar power, water-saving appliances and ‘green’ buildings are all terms we’re familiar with, but now wildlife-safe design is receiving more attention than ever before.

Everything from bats and badgers to nesting birds and invasive non-native species, can be found in and around construction sites and land designated for development. Any of these can put a stop to a project or jeopardise planning permission, so it’s important surveys, assessments and mitigation measures are taken. The term ‘protected species’ refers to species that are protected by legislation. The Wildlife and Countryside Act and the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act make it an offence to intentionally, or recklessly kill, injure, or take a protected species, or damage, destroy or obstruct access to structures or places used by protected species for shelter, breeding or protection.

The industry inevitably involves disturbing existing sites which can impact the ecology. Most development proposals will have the potential to impact on the local biodiversity of the development site either through the direct loss of habitats, the reduction in the value of the habitat or the ability of the habitat to support the species that depend on them. Ecological surveys identify the habitats and/or species that exist within an area at the time of the survey. It is important to ensure that protected species are identified as early as possible in the development of a project, when it is straight forward to accommodate any necessary changes or constraints. It also adds time to a project, so it’s best to identify them as early as possible. After carrying out assessments, if wildlife is identified then they require relocation before any work is started.

During the recent restoration of Lindisfarne Castle in Northumberland, a site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Datim Building Contractors employed a range of initiatives to manage the habitat supporting the wildlife living on the exposed castle and crag. The team considered the findings of weekly ecology surveys and were able to adapt their work to accommodate recommendations from the surveys. A breeding pair of barn owls took advantage of the perfect conditions created by the covered scaffolding to rear two broods of chicks. Once the birds had fledged, Datim even built a ‘swiss chalet’ nestbox to continue to provide shelter for the birds once the scaffolding was removed, enabling the works to continue.

I’d like to think we’re an industry that takes its ecological responsibility seriously, protecting the local wildlife and eco-system wherever possible, so although its legally our responsibility, it’s something that we want to do as well. We all have the same goal, to complete projects as quickly and as efficiently as possible, with wildlife moved to new, safe home where needed.

For more information on Constructing Excellence in the North East, please contact chief executive, Catriona Lingwood, on 0191 500 7880 or email catriona@cene.org.uk.