Two years after Genfell, what’s still to be done?

By Catriona Lingwood, Chief Executive of Constructing Excellence in the North East

Following the devastation of the Grenfell Tower tragedy, the government carried out an independent review of the Building Regulations and Fire Safety. This week, they published a ‘clarified version’ of Approved Document B.

The new version is simplified, uses less jargon and is written in plain English. It now means that building owners can easily follow and understand the requirements expected of them, limiting any misunderstanding of their responsibility for the safety of residents. The document also brings together guidance for flats and houses.

While this is certainly a step in the right direction and should help building owners going forward, it’s been over two years since the Grenfell tragedy and people continue to campaign for safety in tower blocks, proving there is still so much to be done.

Last month, for the second anniversary of the Grenfell disaster, campaigners shone a spotlight on unsafe tower blocks across the country and a tower block in Newcastle was right at the centre. Messages were projected onto the blocks to highlight a genuine safety concern of residents within that building, it read: ‘2 years after Grenfell and the fire doors in this building still don’t work’. I’ve never really discussed the repercussions, or lack of, from Grenfell but I think it’s important we all speak out and keep talking. It’s the only way we’re ever going to see change. Campaigners, Grenfell United are calling for all dangerous cladding to be removed and safe fire doors, sprinklers and clear fire escapes to be installed in all blocks – is that really too much to ask for?

Residents of 12 tower blocks in Manchester are planning to sue the government for failing to protect them from fire amid rising frustration that thousands of people are still living in dangerous homes. Ministers have promised £600m to fund the removal of the type of combustible cladding that spread the fire at Grenfell, but checks since the tragedy have identified many high-rise blocks with other faults including wooden cladding and missing fire breaks, for which no public funding is yet being offered.

The government announced a ban on combustible materials for new buildings in June last year but the ban is limited only to buildings over 18m tall, meaning there is nothing in place to stop the same cladding used in Grenfell from being used in a five-story care home or building, which is terrifying.

I know that so much work has already been done and over the years Newcastle City Council alone has spent over £9m on fire doors and other fire safety measures, but if we still have buildings without fire doors then I personally don’t think enough has been done. We’ve got to keep talking about Grenfell, it’s the only way we’re ever going to see the change that is needed.

For more information on Constructing Excellence in the North East, please contact chief executive, Catriona Lingwood, on 0191 500 7880 or email catriona@cene.org.uk.